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Preconference Workshop

Call for IAPHS 2022 Pre-Conference Workshops

 

IAPHS will offer pre-conference workshops in connection with the 2022 Conference to be held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, September 20-23, 2022. Workshop will be held Tuesday, September 20th.

Proposals will be accepted December 1, 2021 – March 4, 2022

Interactive Workshops

Workshops should be designed to engage the audience in a focused learning, skill-oriented interactive experience. For each workshop, some didactic presentation content is acceptable, but the emphasis should be on engaging with the audience and aimed at filling a current gap in knowledge or practice. Case studies, simulation, small group exercises, and sharing of tools and resources is strongly encouraged. Workshops will be held in 2 hour or 4-hour time blocks.  Proposals will be solicited from the IAPHS membership and reviewed by the Professional Development Committee, in conjunction with the Program Committee Chairs.

Criteria for Workshop Proposals:

Content: The content of the workshop should be relevant to either one or more of the conference topics or fit within the mission of IAPHS. There should be clear learning objectives listed as part of the submitted proposal.

    • Priority will be given to workshops that have potential to advance the impact of interdisciplinary IAPHS research and translation in concordance with the mission of IAPHS, supports and provides additional educational support to advance a new and novel interdisciplinary approach or topic, addresses an ongoing training gap or challenge within IAPHS.

 Structure: The structure of the workshop session should be designed to include elements of didactic and interactive learning methods that provide a high-quality learning experience for the attendees. The workshop should be organized to successfully achieve its learning objectives.

 Impact: The attendees of the workshop should have gained knowledge, skills, or experiences that they can practically apply at their home institutions. Thus, the workshop should explicitly describe how the listed learning objective will be translated into “take-homes” for attendees.

 Faculty: The proposal should describe the qualifications of the faculty/facilitators to lead the workshop session (i.e. their involvement in the implementation or research in a given topic should be described as part of their biographic data).

Thank you for participating in the IAPHS 2021 Pre-Conference Workshops!

 

Clear communication of race and ethnicity for public health: Best practices & common failings

September 23, 2021
12:00 – 4:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Target Audience: Individuals engaged in population health research that incorporates race or ethnicity.

This workshop will help participants of all training levels (pre-, postdoctoral, faculty, clinicians, researchers) develop skills to thoughtfully communicate the use of race and ethnicity in their work. We will highlight current cross-disciplinary practices in how race and ethnicity are communicated in published manuscripts, common poor practices (i.e., ambiguous or outright harmful language), “best practices”, and the changes participants can make in their own scholarship. Given important geographical, historical, and sociopolitical factors of this work, this workshop will be centered in a US context. Read more

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop participants will be able to:

(1) Identify the harms of biological determinism and the ways in which language used by researchers reflects and perpetuates those ideas.
(2) Understand how to effectively communicate the definitions, coding, and measurement of race and ethnicity in their health scholarship.
(3) Identify ambiguous language surrounding scientific communication of definitions, coding, and measurement of race and ethnicity health scholarship.
(4) Thoughtfully critique and provide feedback on conceptualization, measurement, analysis, and interpretation for race and ethnicity in the peer review process.

Workshop Instructors

Co-Chair

Rae Anne M. Martinez, MSPH
Department of Epidemiology, UNC Chapel Hill

Co-Chair

Nafeesa Andrabi, MA
Department of Sociology, UNC Chapel Hill

Presenter

Andrea N. Goodwin, MA
Department of Sociology, UNC Chapel Hill

Presenter

Natalie R. Smith, MS
Department of Health Policy and Management, UNC Chapel Hill

Presenter

Rachel E. Wilbur, MPH
Department of Anthropology, UNC Chapel Hill

Presenter

Paul N. Zivich, MPH
Department of Epidemiology, UNC Chapel Hill

Advancing Health Equity Methodologies and Approaches

September 30, 2021
12:00 – 4:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Target Audience: The workshop will be open to public health practitioners or scientists in any field whose work involves addressing health inequities or advancing the body of knowledge surrounding inequities.

The increasing focus on health equity research will require projects that develop and evaluate evidence-based solutions to health differences that are driven largely by social, economic, and environmental factors. There is a great need for innovative and solutions-oriented health equity research methodology that can be utilized in research and practice as health equity research and funding opportunities continue to grow. Many existing and emerging methods can advance, monitor, and assess progress toward health equity. Read more

Learning Objectives:

The overall learning objectives of the workshop are to help trainees:

1) Learn the value in changing the epistemology and even ontology of our approaches to health equity research.
2) Become aware of existing and emerging methodology and methods that can be applied through a critical health equity research lens.
3) Learn and practice specific methods that can be applied across a range of disciplines.

Workshop Instructors

Co-Chair

Thomas LaVeist, Dean
Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Co-Chair

Andrew Anderson, Assistant Professor
Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Co-Chair

David Chae, Associate Professor
Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Co-Chair

Katherine Theall, Professor
Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Co-Chair and Presenter

Caryn Bell, Assistant Professor
Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Presenter

Melody Goodman, Associate Dean for Research
New York University School of Global Public Health

Presenter

Taylor Hargrove, Assistant Professor
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Presenter

Rachael Hardeman, Associate Professor
University of Minnesota School of Public Health

Presenter

Tyson H. Brown, Associate Professor
Duke University

Presenter

Keon Gilbert, Associate Professor
Saint Louis University

Policy Mapping: Navigating Your Network

September 9, 2021
12:00 – 1:30 PM (Eastern Time)
Target Audience: Any researcher who wants to use their research to improve public policy.

This network mapping workshop gives scholars the tools to map their policy landscape and create a plan to build relationships with policy stakeholders. Participants will create a “network map” that visualizes the ecosystem of decision-makers and influencers surrounding the policy issue their research affects. This map allows researchers to identify key players in their networks to begin the process of relationship building with decision-makers. The training also highlights key insights into how and when policymakers use research evidence.

Learning goals:

At the end of the workshop, participants will:

  1. Understand how and when decision-makers use research evidence in the policymaking process
  2. Know practical, research-based tips for engaging with policy actors and building relationships
  3. Have a map of the broad network of policy actors in their area of research and expertise
  4. Have concrete next steps to take to inform the policymaking process with their research and expertise

Workshop Facilitator

Andrew Pope is the Director of Training at the Scholars Strategy Network. In this role, he works closely with staff and leaders from across the network to develop and deploy trainings that empower scholars to achieve SSN’s mission of using research to improve public policy. Andrew has a PhD from the History Department at Harvard University. His academic work explores how ordinary people crossed traditional lines of difference to influence local, state, and national policy. His dissertation, “Living in the Struggle: Black Power, Gay Liberation, & Women’s Liberation Movements in Atlanta, 1964-1996,” examined the activism of poor and working class African Americans after the Civil Rights Act made Jim Crow illegal. Before joining SSN, Andrew was a postdoctoral fellow at Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for African American Urban Studies & the Economy and taught for Harvard University’s Committee on Degrees in History & Literature.

Connecting & Building Relationships

September 9, 2021
3:00 – 4:00 PM (Eastern Time)
Target Audience: Any researcher who wants to use their research to improve public policy.

This training on building relationships gives scholars an introduction to effective strategies to ensure that researcher’s findings and perspectives inform policy. This session provides evidence-based instructions for how to begin and maintain productive relationships with policymakers, how to engage with civic intermediaries in order to better reach policymakers, and what strategies are critical for creating mutual trust. This session will ensure that scholars have the tools and knowledge to move their research through the policymaking process.

At the end of the workshop, participants will:

  1. Understand the current research findings on how decision-makers use research evidence in the policymaking process
  2. Have practical, evidence-based steps to take when initiating and building a relationship with a policymaker
  3. Leave with a tailored first-contact letter to a policymaker based on their own research and interests

Workshop Facilitator

Andrew Pope is the Director of Training at the Scholars Strategy Network. In this role, he works closely with staff and leaders from across the network to develop and deploy trainings that empower scholars to achieve SSN’s mission of using research to improve public policy. Andrew has a PhD from the History Department at Harvard University. His academic work explores how ordinary people crossed traditional lines of difference to influence local, state, and national policy. His dissertation, “Living in the Struggle: Black Power, Gay Liberation, & Women’s Liberation Movements in Atlanta, 1964-1996,” examined the activism of poor and working class African Americans after the Civil Rights Act made Jim Crow illegal. Before joining SSN, Andrew was a postdoctoral fellow at Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for African American Urban Studies & the Economy and taught for Harvard University’s Committee on Degrees in History & Literature.